The Story of the Yawgoog Trails

Unofficial

Orange Trail - Part I

Total distance: approximately 1.8 miles (2.9 kilometers)
Total hiking time: approximately 30 to 45 minutes


The Orange Trail is the best-known trail, mainly because it is the path that visits most of the major buildings and program centers of the Reservation. This trail is ideal for visitors and campers who are at Yawgoog for the first time; it lets them quickly become familiar with all the things Camp Yawgoog has to offer. This "cook's tour" (Williams and Tracy) of Yawgoog is especially appropriate just after troop arrivals during Sunday evenings or Monday mornings.

It begins, appropriately, where Yawgoog begins -- at the T. Dawson Brown Gateway. The Gateway was named after the man who became President of the Rhode Island Boy Scouts (RIBS) in 1927; the Rhode Island Boy Scouts preceded Narragansett Council, BSA®, as the state's Scouting organization. He was also the Scoutmaster of the Third East Providence Troop. Brown was responsible for obtaining some land around Wincheck Pond and all the land around Yawgoog Pond up to the Connecticut border in 1928. He also obtained the Rocky Point area (formerly called Hillcrest, according to the 1931 Reservation map), the parcel of land where staff cabins overlook Yawgoog Pond, in 1932. He secured the Curtis Tract (described later) in 1935 and the dams and water rights to Yawgoog and Wincheck ponds in 1953. Before being dedicated to Brown the entrance was named Thunderbird Gate, according to the 1931 map.

This gate was designed by F. Ellis Jackson and it features six totems, originally carved by sculptor Aristide Cianfarani. At the top are two Thunderbirds, which some Native Americans believed to be the messengers to the Great Spirit and protectors of campers. The remaining totems symbolize gifts that Scouts may receive when they enter: the Bear (Strength), the Fox (Woodcraft), the Beaver (Industry), and the Owl (Knowledge) (Williams and Anthony vol. 1 pp. 29-30; Williams and Tracy). The totems have been replaced over the years, but the originals can be found in the Bucklin Memorial Building; the replacements include the work of Alan Fontana.

(image)
T. Dawson Brown Gateway
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.196', W 71° 46.496' (Datum: WGS84)

In the 2012 film Moonrise Kingdom Yawgoog was the setting of the fictional "Khaki Scout" camp "Fort Lebanon." Although the Brown Gateway was not in the film, it influenced the design of the Fort Lebanon gate built for the movie in front of the H. Cushman Anthony Stockade. The carvings were also the influence for the raccoon emblems of the "Khaki Scouts" (Murphy).

The T. Dawson Brown Gateway is the third generation of gateways in Yawgoog's history. A very simple frame with "YAWGOOG" existed in the early years, followed by a more substantial structure created by staffer Dan Lamb in 1927 (Yawgoog Alumni Assn. pp. 6-7).

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The first gateway and the Palmer house, circa 1920
(Yawgoog Alumni Assn. pp. 4, 6)
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.196', W 71° 46.496' (Datum: WGS84)

(photograph)
The second gateway, built in 1927 by Dan Lamb
(Yawgoog Alumni Assn. p. 6)
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.196', W 71° 46.496' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

After it passes behind the Reservation trading post the trail arrives at Donald North Court. This quadrangle was named after Donald C. North, who served as Narragansett Council's first Scout Executive from 1916 to 1918. North was responsible for Yawgoog being chosen as a permanent campground for the Rhode Island Boy Scouts. The North Memorial, located between the East and West cabins, was provided by George Benjamin Utter, Editor of The Westerly Sun and a friend of North's. Utter secured a piece of Westerly granite from the Sullivan quarries and had it shaped and carved with funds raised by "old Scouts" from the First Westerly Troop; it was dedicated in 1954 by D. Harold Rogers, a Scoutmaster and Commissioner at Yawgoog in the 1920's.

The Reservation trading post, formerly called the Bucklin Memorial Trading Post, was built in 1919 as a dining hall; it was used as such until 1929, when it was became Yawgoog's headquarters. It was made a permanent trading post when the Bucklin Memorial Building was finished in 1931.

The trading post was refurbished by the Golden Jubilee Fund in 1960 in honor of Jubilee Chairman and former Narragansett Council President Aaron H. Roitman. The Golden Jubilee Fund began in late 1959 as a commemoration of the Council's first fifty years of service. The fund raised approximately $300,000 within a few months for improvements to Yawgoog and the Council's other camps. The trading post building was renovated and enlarged in 2003 to include the Yawgoog Alumni Heritage Center; the porch of the Center is named in honor of Joe Herbold, for his years of service to the Yawgoog Alumni Association. Among the items related to Yawgoog's history, the Heritage Center houses props from Moonrise Kingdom. The trading post is now known as "407 Outfitters," in reference to Yawgoog's Fort Hilton trading post, which stood on Hill 407 (on the Yellow Trail).

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Brown University Drinking Fountain, Reservation Trading Post and Heritage Center
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.147', W 71° 46.526' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

The trading post stands on what used to be the site of the Palmer house; a discussion of the Palmer family, which owned the land before Yawgoog was created, is included in Appendix B. The Palmer well is located in a lilac bush behind the backstop across the road from the trading post; it was Yawgoog's original water supply. Just opposite the northwestern corner of the trading post stood another well that served as Yawgoog's second source of water from 1920 to 1930.

The Bucklin Memorial Building was built by the bequest of Civil War veteran Captain George Bucklin. He began his war service in the 10th Regiment, Rhode Island Infantry, then the 12th Regiment, Rhode Island Infantry, which fought in the Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Bucklin left military service at the end of the war from the 14th Regiment, Rhode Island Heavy Artillery - African-American (Chenery p. 289). He became interested in Scouting when an unknown Scout helped him cross a street in Providence and refused a tip. There are a framed letter and medal in honor of the Scout who did the good turn in the Bucklin's Memorial Room. Mr. Bucklin's bequest also funds Yawgoog's Bucklin Marksmanship Medal, as well as the Eagle Medals earned by Scouts in Narragansett Council. The building was designed by F. Ellis Jackson and built by contractor C.K. Rathbone. The lodge was refurbished in 1996 by a gift from Mary B. Shea and Robert B. Shea.

(portrait)
Captain George Bucklin in Civil War uniform
(Chenery, opposite p. 107)

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Bucklin Memorial Building
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.148', W 71° 46.513' (Datum: WGS84)

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Bucklin Memorial Building in winter
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.148', W 71° 46.513' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

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Bucklin Memorial Building with blooming rhododendron
Image by David R. Brierley

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Memorial Room
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.138', W 71° 46.556' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

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Postcard of the Bucklin Memorial Building, circa 1937
Caption: Bucklin Lodge, Camp Yawgoog, Rockville, R. I.

The beam-ends facing the court above the Bucklin Memorial's arch have four carvings: a hand making the Scout Sign, the emblem of the Boy Scouts of America®, the emblem of the Rhode Island Boy Scouts, and a left-hand offering the Scout Handshake. On the other side (facing Camp Three Point) the carvings are of past or present merit badges: Pioneering, Camping, Personal Health, and Civics. In The Yawgoog Story J. Harold Williams wrote that, together, these carvings mean "He who comes here to live the life of a camper and pioneer gains strength of body and good citizenship" (Williams and Anthony vol. 1 p. 30). (The Personal Health Merit Badge was discontinued in 1952 and the Civics Merit Badge was split into the various Citizenship merit badges.) On the same side of the Bucklin is a large boulder, embedded in the ground; it is known as Mail Rock. In the early years of Yawgoog, mail would be given out to campers there by calling out the names on the letters and packages; the camp's salute cannon used to be mounted on this rock.

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Mail Rock
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 31.143', W 71° 46.555' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

The building houses the All Boats In siren, which is rung to summon watercraft to shore.

Video of the All Boats In sirens at the Bucklin Memorial Building, installed in 2015
Video by David R. Brierley

Video of the former siren at the Bucklin Memorial Building, used through 2014
Video by David R. Brierley

Captain Bucklin's will also funded other construction in and around North Court: the garage, the Gateway, parking lot (also known as the Three Point parking lot), and the East and West cabins. In the summer the East Cabin serves as the Factor's Club for Scoutmasters, a Yawgoog tradition started by "Uncle" Brad H. Field, a Scoutmaster of the Third Cranston Troop; the cabin's porch was used for Roman Catholic services before the St. John Bosco Chapel was built. Both cabins were refurbished by the Golden Jubilee Fund in 1960; the East Cabin in memory of Edwin F. Johnson while the West Cabin's refurbishment was made possible by the Hassenfeld family and the Benjamin N. Kane Foundation. Like all the other cabins in this area, both are used by campers during the off-season.

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East Cabin / Factor's Club
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.144', W 71° 46.519' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

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West Cabin
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.141', W 71° 46.537' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

The flagpoles are in memory of Yawgoog staffer Colonel Robert J. Cotell and replace an older flagpole given by the American Legion. The flagpoles are the centerpiece of the Memorial Walkway, created by the Yawgoog Alumni Association in 2016 -- the Reservation's 100th anniversary.

The structure that completes the Donald North Court is the Brown University Drinking Fountain. The Fountain was designed by Yawgoog Ranger Clinton Lakey "Inkey" Armstrong and built by George Parkhurst; it was presented by Brown President Henry M. Wriston in 1937 in appreciation for the use of Yawgoog for "Freshman Get-Acquainted Week Ends." Next to the garage is a Ranger's house, built in 1936. Just beyond the garage are the warehouse and workshop, erected in 1957 by the Rhode Island Boy Scouts; additional work was supported by the Golden Jubilee Fund in 1960.

Behind the East Cabin/Factor's Club is the Challenge Center. On July 15, 2000, the COPE (Challenging Outdoor Personal Experience) Course was dedicated to all Scouts who went on to serve their country in the armed forces. The stone bench and flagpoles were donated by:

  • U.S. Marines: Senator John H. Chafee, Carl W. Mllymacki III and William G. Schanck, Jr.
  • U.S. Army Soldiers: Leonard Holland and Edward J. Regan

The Challenge field was a filming location for the 2012 movie Moonrise Kingdom; the field was filmed as a tenting and activity area.

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Challenge Center
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.110', W 71° 46.510' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

Inscription: To All Scouts Who Served Their Country.  This C.O.P.E. course is in tribute to Scouts who have served their country as members of the armed forces.  It became a reality because of the brotherhood, the Spirit of Yawgoog left in Yawgoog Scouts.  Dedicated July 15, 2000
COPE Bench
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.103', W 71° 46.496' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

Just before Lattner Cabin, on an overgrown trail to the left (east), is the former location of the Temple of the Ten Commandments. Construction was begun in 1949 by the Jewish Committee on Scouting with the direction of Chairman Jacob S. Temkin, Joseph Jacobson, and others. Dedicated in 1950, it ceased to be used in 1984 when a new Temple was completed next to Tim O'Neil Field. The A-frame, lectern, and bench-supports remain. This general region near the Temple used to contain the Council Ring, used for campfires and ceremonies, and the first rifle range.

After returning to the main trail, travelers will immediately arrive at the Forrest C. Lattner Cabin, built in 1982. The cabin houses the Lattner Wellness Center in the summer.

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Lattner Cabin
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.068', W 71° 46.472' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

Across from Lattner Cabin is an enormous rock known as Dead Man's Rock; it got its strange name because games were played years ago in the area using this portion of the trail as a boundary between sides; players who were captured were "dead men" and were sent to the rock for the rest of the game. The Challenge Field was previously called the Cooking Field, according to the Reservation map of 1931.

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Dead Man's Rock and a challenge course
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 31.072', W 71° 46.484' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

The Orange proceeds down the road beyond Lattner Cabin to the Broulliard Handicapped Awareness Trail (HAT Trail). It was dedicated in 1984 to Roland Broulliard, who served handicapped Cubs and Scouts. This activity lets Scouts experience the challenges of having certain physical disabilities.

The Orange Trail leaves the HAT Trail, passes by another Superintendent's home, and turns right (west) at an intersection and then on to the Protestant Cathedral. Heading straight (south) at the intersection leads the hiker to a ceremonial area used by the Order of the Arrow and Knights of Yawgoog. Behind this ceremonial site is Lizard Ledge; a lizard is said to have been sunning itself there when the area was first "explored" (Williams and Tracy).

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Lizard Ledge
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.970', W 71° 46.485' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

The Orange Trail used to take the left (east) fork into to The Glen, where the road ends. The Glen is a clearing used in the past as a campground and activities area. Some activities were stalking games; the Scoutmaster would stand on the rock (Stalking Rock) in the middle of the clearing while Scouts would try to creep up to him without being seen. Today, The Glen is used for Challenge Center activities; please stay off the equipment.

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The Glen and Stalking Rock (lower center)
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.991', W 71° 46.434' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

After leaving The Glen, a short side-trail leads southeast across a long ledge and through shrubs to a point of land where a large boulder juts into Wincheck Pond. This popular rock is called Toad Rock because it resembles a sitting toad when viewed from its eastern side, near the water line (the "toad" faces south). It is appropriate that "Wincheck" is a Nipmuck term, meaning "at the pleasant place" (Huden p. 288).

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Toad Rock (a shrub obscures part of the head)
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.927', W 71° 46.423' (Datum: WGS84)

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Panoramic view of Wincheck Pond from Toad Rock
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.927', W 71° 46.423' (Datum: WGS84)
Larger image
Google Map

Leaving Toad Rock and climbing a rock ledge called Old Baldy, the former route of the Orange Trail comes to an open view of Thrush Cove. Thrush Cove was named for the thrushes that were singing there when the first camp explorers hiked through this area. Large glacial boulders lie to the left (south), some of which are mistaken for Toad Rock. The clearing by the boulders used to serve as the place of Protestant worship. It was slightly damaged by the forest fire of 1930, and heavily damaged by the hurricane of 1938. The high number of trees blown over by the windstorm caused the Reservation to move the worship center farther inland to where the Protestant Cathedral is now.

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Old Baldy
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.943', W 71° 46.474' (Datum: WGS84)
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View of Thrush Cove
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.947', W 71° 46.549' (Datum: WGS84)
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American white/fragrant waterlilies (Nymphaea odorata)
at Thrush Cove
Image by David R. Brierley

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Former site of Protestant Cathedral
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.947', W 71° 46.549' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

(postcard)
Postcard of services at the former Cathedral, circa 1929
Coordinates: N 41° 30.947', W 71° 46.549' (Datum: WGS84)

The beautiful Cathedral was largely the result of the efforts of Reverend John A. Gardner, "an Episcopal rector who always loved scouting and camp life." He persuaded the Trinity Church of Newport to donate the original log altar, dedicated to Charles F. Harrington, and Cross in 1945; he also donated and raised money for the Cathedral's equipment (dedicated to Charles S. Brown, a Scoutmaster and Commissioner of the Pawtuxet Valley District, by his family and district in 1957). The Rhode Island State Council of Churches then allowed the Protestant Committee on Scouting to make further improvements and expansions. This was done under the direction of Chairman Sidney Clifford and Reverend Earl Hollier Tomlin, Executive Secretary of the Council of Churches. Services are held daily during the summer camp season.

The Cathedral features a tall log Cross and altar, complete with two lecterns, and permanent benches. The trail descends the Steps of the Scout Law; each stone contains an inscription of a word of the Law. Ranger "Inkey" Armstrong built the staircase; the stonecutting was done by Joseph Percy, Scoutmaster of Troop 8 Pawtucket.

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Protestant Cathedral
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.973', W 71° 46.535' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

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Steps of the Scout Law
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.984', W 71° 46.560' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

After descending the stairs, the Orange Trail arrives at an intersection in a rhododendron forest, which blooms beautifully in mid-July. To the left (south) a short trail returns to Wincheck Pond; on the right (north) is the Adams Trail, named after the late Herbert M. Adams, who donated money for the Protestant Cathedral's improvement.

Continuing straight ahead (west) on the boardwalk from the base of the staircase, the hiker will soon understand why this portion of the Orange Trail is called the Swamp Trail.

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Swamp Trail Boardwalk, near the Protestant Cathedral
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.992', W 71° 46.592' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

Video of tadpoles at the Swamp Trail by David R. Brierley

The trail finally rises onto dry land and passes behind Campsite Oak Ridge. The path leading to the campsite is known as the Oak Ridge Trail; it used to continue up to The Fortress, an enormous boulder on the Cove Trail. The Swamp Trail emerges near the Three Point dining hall -- Sharpe Lodge.

Sharpe Lodge was built in 1924 as the Bucklin Lodge; it was renamed in 1961 after the Sharpe family of Rhode Island, who had been very generous in donating to various charities. The area around the dining hall used to be known as the "Lower Camp." The "Upper Camp" was the area around what was to become the Bucklin Memorial Group. Camp Three Point, named after the three points of the Scout Oath, used to be known as the Three Point Division in 1929 (Williams and Anthony vol. 1 p. 7). (Rathom Lodge was completed in 1929 to create the Medicine Bow Division.)

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Sharpe Lodge
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.113', W 71° 46.691' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

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Interior of Sharpe Lodge
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.096', W 71° 46.684' (Datum: WGS84)
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(postcard)
Postcard of what is now Sharpe Lodge, circa 1930
Caption: Bucklin Lodge, Camp Yawgoog, Rockville, R.I.
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.114', W 71° 46.699' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

The Memorial Bell Tower, dedicated on August 8, 1943, is opposite the northeastern corner of the lodge. The 300-pound bronze bell, which came from a South County mill, was donated by Troop 1 Wakefield. The tower may have been designed by W. Douglas Gardiner and built under the direction of by Ranger "Inkey" Armstrong. The bell is rung at noon every day during the camp season; the tolls symbolize the twelve points of the Scout Law. It has also been a Yawgoog tradition for everyone to pause while the bell tolls and remember the Scouts who died in service to their country. It is important to mention that this tradition began spontaneously, without any orders or suggestions from the Reservation leadership. The bell was also rung on Sundays for religious services and on Memorial Days during special ceremonies to remember fallen veterans.

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Memorial Bell Tower
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.111', W 71° 46.677' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

Video of the ringing of the Memorial Bell, by David R. Brierley

To hear the ringing of the bell from Hemlock Ledge across Yawgoog Pond, see the Yellow Trail.

U.S. Army Captain Elwood J. Euart, an Eagle Scout and Yawgoog alumnus from Troop 1 Pawtucket, was one of 319 Narragansett Council Scouts who gave their lives in World War II; his portrait hangs in the Memorial Room of the Bucklin Memorial Building. He died during the sinking of the U.S. Army Transport President Coolidge on October 26, 1942. The citation for his posthumous Distinguished Service Cross recounts his heroism:

Having safely reached his abandoned-ship station, he learned of men trapped in the hold and went there. By lashing himself to the low end of a rope he was able to hold it tight enough for men to climb up it to safety, even though the ship was badly listing. Finally, as he attempted to climb up, almost vertically by that moment, with the help of a few men at the other end of the line, the ship careened and sank very quickly. Captain Euart exhausted himself assisting many others, whose lives were thus undoubtedly spared at the expense of his own. (qtd. in J.H. Williams, Scout Trail pp. 38-39; Stone p. 104)

(portrait)
U.S. Army Captain Elwood J. Euart
(Stone p. 104)

From the tower, looking west toward Yawgoog Pond, hikers can see the Three Point Amphitheater, refurbished by the Yawgoog Alumni Association. Three Point's waterfront building, built in 1960 by the Golden Jubilee Fund as a memorial to David C. Scott, brother-in-law of staffer Chet Worthington, can also be seen; the waterfront building was refurbished in 1996 by the Alumni Association. "Yawgoog" is derived from the Narragansett term meaning "on one side of the pond" (Huden p. 297). A few yards away from the tower is the Fallon Flagpole, dedicated to the memory of Yawgoog staffer Jim Fallon. The area behind the showers used to function as Camp Three Point's nature center when each camp had its own nature program years ago. Camp Medicine Bow's center, "Natscoland," was located between the Armington Memorial Health Lodge and the H. Cushman Anthony Stockade; Camp Sandy Beach had "Camecoville," where Campsite Richard Byrd is today.

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Camp Three Point Amphitheatre
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.120', W 71° 46.700' (Datum: WGS84)
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Camp Three Point Waterfront
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.106', W 71° 46.703' (Datum: WGS84)
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View from the Camp Three Point Waterfront
Image by David R. Brierley

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Camp Three Point Waterfront in Autumn
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 31.121', W 71° 46.726' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

(postcard)
Postcard of Camp Three Point waterfront, circa 1927
Caption: The Waterfront at Yawgoog - Providence Scout Camp

(postcard)
Postcard of Camp Three Point waterfront, circa 1930
Caption: Bucklin Waterfront - Camp Yawgoog

The trail continues eastward from the tower along Marvel Road, which ends at the Sandy Beach waterfront. The road is named after Dr. Fred W. Marvel, who was the first Camping Committee Chairman and a Narragansett Council Scout Commissioner from 1936 until his death in 1938. The Fred W. Marvel Award was originally given to the "Scout of the Year"; it is now presented to the Counselor-In-Training who has displayed the greatest "Leadership and Scouting qualities" during the summer (Williams and Anthony vol. 1 p. 36; Williams and Tracy). The J. Harold Williams Award for Brotherhood is now given to as many as three Scouts each week of the camp season for outstanding expression of Scouting's ideals.

Leading to the Bucklin Memorial Building, Marvel Road reaches the J. Harold Williams Amphitheatre. It was proposed in 1943 as a gift to celebrate J. Harold Williams's twenty-fifth anniversary as Scout Executive and Camp Chief. Scouts and Scouters began collecting for the "Amphitheatre Fund" and construction was begun in the fall of 1945; dedication was held on July 21 of the following year (Williams and Anthony vol. 1 p. 40). It initially was a 50-foot (15-meter) square stage, flanked by stone pillars, all facing sloping terraces graded out of the hillside among the oak trees. In later years permanent benches, paved walkways, stockade, blockhouse, and tree plantings were added; some of these were part of an enlargement made possible by the family of George B. Champlin through the Golden Jubilee Fund in 1960. (Champlin Scout Reservation in Cranston, formerly known as Snake Den and Skeleton Valley, is named after Mr. Champlin.) Further improvements have been made over the years by the Yawgoog Alumni Association. Before the construction of the Amphitheatre the site was called the Nature Den -- an early nature center. A campsite called the Kennel Club also existed near the Amphitheatre's location.

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J. Harold Williams Amphitheatre
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.128', W 71° 46.608' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

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Inside the J. Harold Williams Amphitheatre
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.121', W 71° 46.603' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

Two beautifully carved totem poles were built in the Amphitheatre in 1961; one illustrates the life of Williams and the other tells of Yawgoog's history. The original poles were designed by John C. Page, a District Executive and inventor of the Totin' Chip program; they were built by Explorer Post 22 Providence under the advisement of Earl Tillman. Both have been replaced over the years with support from the Yawgoog Alumni Association; replacements have been carved by Alan Fontana. The poles were temporarily moved to the H. Cushman Anthony Stockade for the filming of Moonrise Kingdom.

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Chief Williams Totem
Image by David R. Brierley

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Camp Yawgoog Totem
Image by David R. Brierley

Between the Amphitheatre and the Bucklin Memorial Building, at the beginning of the path to the Protestant Cathedral, is a lych gate, originally donated by Herbert M. Adams and built by Ranger "Inkey" Armstrong. The gate was transformed into a chapel for the filming of Moonrise Kingdom.

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Adams Gate on the trail to the Protestant Cathedral
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.127', W 71° 46.580' (Datum: WGS84)

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Adams Gate being converted to a chapel for Moonrise Kingdom (soundtrack liner notes)
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.127', W 71° 46.580' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

Across from the Amphitheatre is Campsite Sleepy Hollow, which has been used as a Webelos campsite in the past. The Webelos are located in Campsite Sequan in Medicine Bow ("Sequan" is a Native American word for the Spring season [R. Williams p. 144]).

Passing by the Amphitheatre and proceeding toward the Bucklin Memorial Building, the hiker will notice a small staff cabin on the left, now known as Wincheck Cabin. It was built in 1926 as the Reservation's first infirmary; funds were raised by a committee of Scout mothers, led by Mrs. Clara Raymond (wife of Bernard P. Raymond) of Troop 28 Providence. It used to go by the names "The Scout Mother's Hospital" and "Maternity Hospital" until it was replaced in 1941 by the Armington Memorial Health Lodge, which will be described shortly (Williams and Anthony vol. 1 p. 20).

(postcard)
Postcard of the Scout Mother's Hospital (now Wincheck Cabin), circa 1930
Caption: Camp Hospital - Camp Yawgoog

Next to the cabin is a stone pavilion -- the Order of the Arrow Information Center. This building is operated by the Tulpe Lodge #102 of the Order of the Arrow as a place to schedule elections, to buy memorabilia, and to exchange information about the Order and Yawgoog. The pavilion also houses the Golden Jubilee Honor Court plaques, which list the major donors of the Golden Jubilee Fund of 1960. The Tulpe Lodge merged with Abnaki Lodge #102 in 2015 as part of the merger of the Narragansett and Annawon councils in 2015. The Abnaki Lodge was formed in 2002 by the merger of Narragansett Council's Wincheck Lodge #534 and Moby Dick Council's Neemat Lodge #124; the two councils merged earlier on July 1, 2001. The Wincheck Indians, founded in 1922 were Yawgoog's junior honor society before the days of the Order of the Arrow (Williams and Tracy); the Wincheck Indians became the Wincheck Lodge in 1958. For the filming location of Moonrise Kingdom the structure was converted to a supply and resources center.

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Order of the Arrow Information Center
Image by David R. Brierley
Approximate coordinates: N 41° 31.156', W 71° 46.591' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

(photograph)
Photograph of Wincheck Indians at Dress Parade, 1941

 

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