The Story of the Yawgoog Trails

Unofficial

Cove Trail


Although not officially a part of Camp Yawgoog's trail system, the Cove Trail appears to have been one of J. Harold Williams's favorites. This trail was the third trail created by the Reservation (Williams and Tracy). Its name is the result of the fact that the trail follows the shores of Thrush Cove and Long Cove, the longest in Wincheck Pond. At this writing the trail is badly overgrown in some places and has no markers, although a few painted blue triangles may still be seen on rocks along the way. It hugs the shore of Wincheck Pond -- from Toad Rock to the dam on Yawgoog Pond -- for a distance of 0.5 mile (0.8 kilometer). Allowing for the overgrowth, the hiking time is roughly twenty to thirty minutes. A word of caution: this trail passes through or near several campsites in Camp Three Point; hikers should not hike through occupied sites without prior permission from the troops camping in them.

Starting from Toad Rock, the trail heads west and climbs a big rock ledge called Old Baldy. After arriving at Thrush Cove (near the Protestant Cathedral), the Cove Trail breaks from the Orange Trail; heading to the left (west), it follows a path along the shore that crosses Lost Brook and rises up to Campsite Zuccolo. This campsite is named in memory of the very popular Yawgoog staffer Angelo Zuccolo, known by his many friends as "Prof. Zook de Spook." The area around the site used to be known as Ant Hill Park in the 1930's.

Continuing along the shore, the path enters Campsite Scott. Wilbur A. Scott served on the Narragansett Council Board of Directors for many years and was a generous financial contributor as well. Toenail Rock, a boulder with an overhang low to the ground, was found when the site was being cleared. The trail, still following the shore, comes across a large rock named The Tank, because it resembles a World War I tank.

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Toenail Rock in winter
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.892', W 71° 46.592' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

(image)
The Tank
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.851', W 71° 46.618' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

The trail later meets Osprey Point and Campsite Street, named after Henry A. Street -- a benefactor of Narragansett Council and a Sea Scouting enthusiast in the 1930's. Osprey Point juts into Wincheck Pond opposite the Red Trail's Old Settlers' Point. A short path leads from the campsite to a series of ledges that stretch into the water at Echo Point. Besides providing a great view and a great echo, this spot is good for fishing and watching large turtles.

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Panoramic view of Long Cove from Echo Point
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.877', W 71° 46.696' (Datum: WGS84)
Larger image
Google Map

(image)
Winter view from Echo Point
Image by David R. Brierley

After Campsite Street, the Cove Trail parallels Long Cove and comes to a large boulder called The Fortress; it is about 38 feet (11.5 meters) in length and 8 feet (2.5 meters) high. Within one minute after leaving The Fortress the hiker arrives at Grand Canyon, behind Campsite 49'er; Chief Williams describes it:

Behind Camp 49er there is a series of breaks in the ledge made by the glacier which is known as "Grand Canyon". This is quite high above the surface of Long Cove. The hiker should note another tremendous glacial boulder [inside] Camp 49er. Boulders like The Tank, The Fortress and The 49er were picked up by the glacier somewhere along its march and came to rest on Camp Yawgoog soil when the glacier melted 30,000 years ago. (Williams and Tracy)

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The Fortress
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.927', W 71° 46.709' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

(image)
Grand Canyon
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.944', W 71° 46.734'> (Datum: WGS84)

(image)
View of Long Cove from Grand Canyon
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.944', W 71° 46.734' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

(image)
The 49er
Image by David R. Brierley
Coordinates: N 41° 30.967', W 71° 46.726' (Datum: WGS84)
Google Map

The trail descends and passes behind Campsite Musketeer, arriving at a grove of beech trees; this place is called Chief's Grove, a favorite resting spot of Chief Williams after hikes (Williams and Tracy). The Grove is near The Portage, the stream that carries water from the dam's gate. Hikers can follow the stream to the road near Campsite Donald C. Dewing, on the Yellow and Red trails.
 

Trail-related Links

 

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